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People's Choice Award

This award recognizes two outstanding student groups selected by the students at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. The nominees in this category are the top 5 groups in the Outstanding Undergraduate Student Group of the Year and top 5 groups in the Outstanding Graduate or Professional Student Group of the Year categories as determined by the Excellence Awards Selection Committee. The two winning groups will be announced at the Tony Diggs Excellence Awards Ceremony.

Check back in March 2017 to vote for the People’s Choice Award. Below are nomination excerpts from last year's nominees.

Group Nominee Overview

Outstanding Undergraduate Student Group of the Year

Outstanding Graduate or Professional Student Group of the Year

Outstanding Undergraduate Student Group of the Year

Al-Madinah Cultural Center

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

Al-Madinah seeks to create a better understanding and appreciation for the diverse cultures of Islam through educational, social, and community activities at the University of Minnesota, providing a welcoming environment for all students to gather and interact.

The mission is executed through the use of several goals, some of which include the expansion of AMCC’s presence throughout the university community, encouragement of student participation through emphasis on leadership development, and interdependent relationship-building with numerous student organizations on campus.

A new program, RealTalk, which was introduced during Spring 2015, sought to engage the community in addressing social issues and promoting activism. RealTalk creates a safe and productive platform for students to discuss controversial topics within both the Muslim and wider campus communities, two examples being Mental Disability and Racism. The recurring program also seeks to educate the University community by opening conversations about negative experiences and solutions to the varying issues.

AMCC achieved its goal of interdependence with other student groups by increasing the amount of collaborative events throughout the year, such as Culture Vultures, International Bazaar, Fast-a-Thon, Eidrageous, etc. The Fall 2015 International Bazaar consisted of collaborating with fifteen affiliate and non-affiliate groups participating in the event, demonstrating both interdependence and appreciation of cultural differences.

Finally, AMCC has consistently put effort towards leadership development. This was achieved mostly by fostering creativity among the board members and interns while encouraging all individuals to perform tasks which were out of their comfort zones. This ultimately increased their tolerance of ambiguous situations.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

Al-Madinah has sought to increase membership, collaborate with student organizations, and expand its presence on and off campus in unprecedented ways. The second ever College Day co-hosted with the Muslim Students Association involved recruiting more than one-hundred students from over a dozen high schools in the greater Twin Cities community. These students attended workshops about colleges and majors, engagement opportunities, time management, and being a Muslim at the University of Minnesota. AMCC has also been successful in demonstrating innovative ways of recruitment with the First-Year Mentoring Program, where participants were able to develop skills regarding responsibility and interdependence.

AMCC has also been able to effectively reach out to members and organizations in the community. The International Bazaar and Eidragious involved a great deal of communication with the affiliated student organizations. Similarly, College Day required connecting with over a dozen local high schools and maintaining a close relationship with the Office of Admissions and the Multicultural Center for Academic Excellence.

During this year, AMCC has strived to implement a system of event planning that would not only improve the fluidity and professionalism of our events, but also help those in the years to come. We have paid extremely close attention to detail and have made an art of the documentation process. With over fifty pages of event planning and evaluation for the Fall semester alone, we wish to set an example for other organizations to follow and overall allow for more spectacular, engaging, and enjoyable events.

Biology Without Borders

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The mission of this group is to lead students in annual global volunteer trips while connecting students with resources. The purpose of this group is to make students advocates for social and global change. The goal of our group is to promote ethical volunteerism as well as community-based and sustainable projects in underserved areas, both locally and globally. The group has done many things which have improved and exceeded the goals and objectives of Biology Without Borders (BWB). We have continued to plan and have good attendance for our two current global volunteer trips to Peru and Tanzania. We have also branched out and begun researching and planning for possible new trips, both abroad as well as in different parts of the United States. After recently becoming an RSO, the students on the trip have now been connecting with various campus and non-campus resources which they have not connected with before. As for the purpose of this group, by sending members on international volunteer trips, along with different events which are held throughout the semester to raise awareness for social issues in Peru and Tanzania, group members, especially those participating in the trips, continually become advocates for social issues on a global scale. We have also improved in accomplishing our goal of ethically volunteering in underserved areas by continuing our international trips as well as consistently volunteering at places such as the Salvation Army in Minneapolis at minimum biweekly. In these ways, we provide sustainable aid to the underserved both locally and abroad.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

BWB was outstanding in terms of recruiting for a variety of ways. We attended every activities fair throughout fall semester this year, and we have had outstanding attendance in comparison to previous years. We have also improved our marketing of our events and programs by hanging up and passing out flyers on campus. We have also been making announcements about upcoming large events in classes. The board and committee members have also been putting up the event flyers on their social media pages for advertisement. To reach out to the campus community, we held an event which partnered with another student organization which helped BWB be active and influence another group and other students on campus. For this particular event, as well as a few other events held last semester, we received grants from SUA to help fund supplies and food for the events. We applied for grants for nearly every event held last semester. We also volunteered as a group at Valleyfair to raise money for our events this year. We also use many campus resources for our international trips such as the learning abroad center and the legal services. As for officer training, every officer in BWB attended various officer training meetings held by the university to help them  improve their effectiveness in their position. Each officer also met with the president of BWB before last semester started to go over their expectations and duties. As for event planning, this year we have created a committee which is composed of 3 officers as well as 4 group members whose duties are to plan events and help them run smoothly. This has helped improve the effectiveness and complexity of our events.

Camp Kesem-Minnesota

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The mission of Camp Kesem is to support children through and beyond their parent’s cancer with innovative, fun-filled programs that foster a lasting community. Camp Kesem Minnesota provides a free summer camp to children affected by a parent’s cancer. Led by the passionate volunteer efforts of University of Minnesota-Twin Cities students, Camp Kesem delivers what these kids need most- support, understanding, and empathy as they deal with a reality no child should face. Camp Kesem Minnesota has been able to support and provide camp to our specific population of children whose parents have been affected by cancer for the past 4 years. Our goal has been to continue outreach, and expand the size and length of our camp to reach a larger population. We have shattered our goals in the past, and have been able to continue to grow the numbers of campers we serve, and the length of time of camp. This past summer, we were able to continue to serve our returning families with an 85% retention rate from the summer of 2014. By spreading the camp over two weeks, we were able to welcome new families and invite 34 new campers, an increase of 40% from the previous year.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

With each year of camp, support for Camp Kesem Minnesota grows within the Minnesota area. Our Volunteer Coordinators worked exceptionally to promote our interview dates, and encourage undergraduate students to apply to join. This year, we were able to recruit 29 new counselors, for a total of almost 50% new student leaders. Our Volunteer coordinators are responsible for planning three counselor training seminars, as well as requiring completion of online counselor training camp videos that Camp Kesem National uses as an organizational standard.

The Executive Board is also comprised of a PR Coordinator, and two Outreach Coordinators. Through their continued work we have been able to expand our presence on all forms of social media, and upgrade to a new fundraising online platform. Our Outreach Coordinators also use our community to spread awareness of Camp Kesem, and continuously recruit new families to join the Camp Kesem family. We also reach out to schools, guidance counselors, hospitals, and social workers in the Twin Cities area to fundraise and meet new families.

Because we provide our camp for free, the student leaders are responsible for raising our entire budget. We continue to capitalize on our location by completing profit shares, volunteer cleanups, fundraisers, and bake sales on campus. Only 9% of this budget is devoted to overhead costs paid directly to Camp Kesem National. Otherwise, the funds are spent to provide each camper with free food, lodging, art supplies, and other items for camp activities for an entire week.

Engineers Without Borders

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

EWB-USA UMN supports community-driven development programs worldwide by collaborating with local partners to design and implement sustainable engineering projects, while creating transformative experiences and responsible leaders. EWB-USA UMN is unique in that we both give students a way to grow and develop their professional skills in a way that classes do not, and at the time give students an opportunity to give back to others less fortunate than themselves. Over the past year, EWB-USA UMN has made great steps to further our mission. In the summer of 2015, we launched three teams of students on international implementation projects in three different countries. Our teams implemented pipe insulation and protection in Bolivia, a coffee nursery and rainwater harvesting system in Uganda, and a phase one of a water distribution system in Guatemala. With our three implementation projects, we have made great headway toward improving the lives of those in our partner communities. Over the past year, EWB-USA UMN has also done an excellent job fostering student leadership. We have added ten new members to our administration board, making sure that younger students have an opportunity to grow their leadership skills. Specifically, our administrative positions help students to learn public speaking, decision making, and delegation.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

EWB-USA UMN participated in multiple student organization fairs this past year including the fall activities fair, sustainability fair, and CSE student organization fair. Officers of our chapter were trained in a yearly retreat designed to set individual and chapter goals for the year. Our chapter has tried to use utilize many of the University’s resources. We consistently apply for SVF grants, we mostly work on the University’s Google drive accounts, we utilize the expertise of accounts at the University, and we review student group resources. Our chapter holds weekly meetings to plan events. Additionally, the chapter holds monthly general meetings with activities to promote chapter wide bonding and collaboration. Occasionally, the monthly meetings include community service activities and guest lectures. Our chapter also plans a yearly reception designed to thank our donors and members for their support.

Society of Women Engineers

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The mission for the Society of Women Engineers is "Stimulate women to achieve full potential in careers as engineers and leaders, expand the image of the engineering profession as a positive force in improving the quality of life, and demonstrate the value of diversity." Our chapter strives to uphold this through outreach, professional development, mentor-ship and more.  CSE’s Fall Career Fair has been planned by our chapter with the help of the career center.   We are excited about the growth it has seen and the opportunities it has given to those involved.  Our mentor-ship and professional development programs give members the chance to network and learn from professionals as well as each other. To promote engineering on campus and beyond, our section holds many social events and outreach events. We host 2 large outreach events on campus per year with more than 100 high school girls each, and work in schools to encourage and promote science and engineering. We recently started a team that works on a technical design project from an industry sponsor for a national competition where we received Honorable Mention this past year.  We host monthly general meetings, and had the honor of having a prior National president speak at one last fall. Finally, our members are high achieving members of the college, and last year 100% of our graduating seniors had a job or were admitted to grad school within 3 months of graduation, demonstrating the value others see in us as female engineers and leaders.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

Our student group runs recruitment with a week full of fun events each fall called “SWE” Week. For one full week, we host at least one event per day, sometimes more. This week features events such as a group fitness class, a waffle breakfast, and liquid nitrogen ice cream.These events help us to recruit new members. We use classic marketing techniques such as email, fliers, and social media, along with recruiting first-year students to help us advertise to residential life communities, and passing out printed calendars of our upcoming events at our monthly general meetings. Our group takes great pride in how we have managed our finances over the past year. We were able to obtain grants for many of our larger events, and a new corporate sponsorship program helped us increase the amount of people we brought to the annual conference in Nashville this year. Our treasurer screens every budget request, and offers suggestions for cost savings, which is especially important with newer leaders who may need more help with ordering food or buying supplies for events. We host monthly meetings for our 30 leaders to check in on event planning, offer suggestions on event improvement and look ahead at what is coming.  We also use this meeting time to train officers on  things such as effective meeting planning or event advertising. We are very respected by CSE as a student group and have committed to excellence and quality in our work.

Outstanding Graduate or Professional Student Group of the Year

Hispanic Student Dental Association

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The mission, purpose and goals of our student group are modeled after the national professional group, the Hispanic Dental Association. This national organization’s mission and vision states “As the leading voice for Hispanic oral health we provide service, education, advocacy, and leadership for elimination of oral health disparities in the Hispanic community.” In addition, Article I of our HSDA Constitution states “The purpose of the Hispanic Student Dental Association is to provide oral health education to young children.The HSDA also works to encourage young people to consider and pursue careers in dental health. Through community based outreach programs, the  HSDA meets these purposes. The HSDA works together with other organizations with similar goals in order to reach more individuals.”The HSDA has pursued these goals by focusing our outreach on oral health education to Hispanic youth at Centro Tyrone Guzman and Community of Saints Regional Schools. We also provided a TED talk and oral health advice at the 3rd Annual Rivers and Waters Health Fair, which was aimed a under-served community in St Paul struggling to meet it's oral healthcare needs.. We are exceeding our group goals by helping to eliminate the language barrier Spanish speaking patients may encounter when visiting the University of Minnesota Dental clinics. The HSDA offers Spanish language lessons at the U of MN School of Dentistry and by providing ‘Advanced Spanish’ lessons every other week throughout the year. These Spanish language lessons are made available to all who may be interested. We have continued our collaboration with and support of other groups and activities such as the MDA's Give Kids A Smile Day.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

Our recruiting was excellent this year. Membership records from last year are incomplete, and the only record shows 15 paid members. This year the club has 98 paid members. The officers made it our goal to be more responsible for accurate record keeping, and to market our group to the incoming dental class. We also marketed our group in 2 new ways: by providing a breakfast to the new first year dental students, and by having a ‘Fiesta’ welcome social open to all dental students.The resources we have used have included membership dues and income from the annual fundraiser. We have also benefited from financial support from the School of Dentistry Office of Student Affairs and the Office of Admissions and Diversity for traveling to our Annual Conference in San Antonio, TX.

Officer training was an outstanding part of this year’s Annual Conference and has benefited the group greatly. Since elected in May 2015, all 7 officers have been held responsible and accountable for fulfilling their roles as described in our constitution. All have been very involved, which is a big improvement from previous years. Officers meet about 1 time per month to maintain self?awareness of the group, and to set goals for the upcoming 1?2 months. Five of the 7 officers attended the past Annual Conference, where leadership development and goal setting for our student group was a primary focus. In addition, all current officers are creating detailed guidelines to pass to future officers to improve accountability of future officers’ involvement.Event planning is a major outstanding piece of our group’s annual efforts. Our main event is a clothing sale fundraiser that raises money for both our group and a Bolivian children’s hospital. This year, the event raised $7,176.00. Of this, $2,517.00 went to our student group, and $2,517 was raised for the Bolivian children’s hospital. This was accomplished by organizing with the Student Activities Office for a table reservation, and by the efforts of about 30 members over 5 days in December. The event was a success. In addition, our welcome ‘Fiesta’ was a new event this year. It was the 1st Annual, and is  included in the budget for next year. The event was hosted by several HSDA members who were also members of the  Psi Omega dental fraternity This event proved to have a great impact on our recruiting efforts by attracting about 60 students.

Latino Law Students Association

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The Latino Law Student Association (LLSA) strives to promote and enhance the progress of individual Latino law students as well as the political socio-economic advancement of the Latino community. This year, LLSA exceeded these goals by coordinating projects and events between its members and the local community.

More specifically, LLSA collaborated with the Minnesota Hispanic Bar Association to give its members an opportunity to join a mentorship program with Latino attorneys. Further, the University of Minnesota Law School was the most represented school in this year’s program, providing half of the law student participants.

Beyond statewide organizations, LLSA connected students with local attorneys by collaborating with Twin Cities law firms. LLSA facilitated networking opportunities and even hosted Latino attorneys at its meetings. In fact, LLSA now has requests from alumni who want to come share their experience at LLSA events. To sustain this active alumni involvement, the student group is producing an Alumni Newsletter to highlight LLSA’s events, upcoming projects, and new member profiles.

LLSA also engages with the local community by organizing volunteer projects for nonprofit organizations. Additionally, LLSA joined forces with other student organizations to facilitate a diversity film series and other professional events for which attorneys earn Continuing Legal Education credits.

Lastly, while LLSA strives to encourage member professional development, it also coordinates informal socials throughout the year to provide a safe space for members to socialize with other Latinos outside of a formal academic setting.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

LLSA completely revamped its recruitment and marketing strategies. Specifically, it increased its social media presence by streamlining all marketing materials, from flyers and social media banners to presentation materials. Most notably, LLSA created its first official logo.  Further, LLSA tabled in the Law School student sub plaza and hosted socials allowing all students an opportunity to interact with LLSA members. LLSA’s effort paid off as its membership increased over 32% this year.

LLSA also creatively managed its finances despite minimal organization financial support.  For example, members donated or lent personal possessions (e.g., books, videos, props for tabling, and snacks) to minimize costs. LLSA also collaborated with alumni who volunteered their time, keeping costs low and allowing LLSA to spend its limited financial resources on other initiatives.

In the fall, LLSA discovered that funds from a previous year’s reimbursement check had gone uncashed. Although initially disappointed, this year’s LLSA was not deflated. The group analyzed why the check went uncashed, and is currently in the process of recovering the missing funds from the State.  

To ensure continued progress, LLSA restructured a board position retitled as the Advisory Board Member (ABM). The ABM is a law student in his or her last year of study. This person provides LLSA with organizational memory and continuity. Additionally, two first-year law students are closely involved with the board, both of whom serve as ambassadors for their respective classes.

Minnesota Pharmacy Student Alliance

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

MPSA is a remarkably large and complex student organization, extending across two campuses (Duluth and Minneapolis) and serving as an umbrella for student chapters of 11 national pharmacy organizations.  MPSA is committed to the advancement of the profession of pharmacy and the professional development of student pharmacists through a diverse portfolio of extracurricular opportunities that foster professional engagement and self-development. By brining all of these entities together into one organization, MPSA seeks to create collaboration and a sense of community rather than allow competition and divisiveness to occur between the respective chapters.  

MPSA offers growth and learning opportunities for student pharmacists by offering numerous leadership opportunities for its members, which support student development outcomes, specifically responsibility and accountability, independence and interdependence and goal orientation.  While this section speaks to the overall goals established for the organization as a whole, I hope that the reader can appreciate how successfully delivering the number of events and activities offered and coordinating 10 different student chapters can only occur through a well-managed process that relies on these student development outcomes across a large number of student leaders.  The MPSA leadership team consists of 12 Executive Board Members, 20 Professional Association Liaisons, and over 30 patient care coordinators.  The level of trust that must be established between student leaders, the personal accountability for action, the need for interdependence among leaders across campuses and a clear set of goals for the organization and for each individual sub-chapter and patient care projects is significant.  I have served as the chapter advisor for this organization since 2000 and this year, with this group of student leaders, has truly been one of the strongest ever in terms of their expression of these outcomes.

This year, the leadership team has successfully raised the level of engagement of its membership, holding over 10 interprofessional events and re-focusing previous outreach activities to better align with the unique knowledge and skills of student pharmacists.  MPSA has developed 15 new inter-organizational collaborations this year.  The leadership team revamped and streamlined its communication systems for an enhanced member experience.  It has been a remarkable year of growth in leadership and execution on the organization’s defined goals.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

In order to start the year off strong, the MPSA Executive Board organizes a retreat in Hinckley, MN. The liaisons and coordinators from the Duluth and Twin Cities campus meet to get to know each other, internalize the vision and goals of MPSA, understand the expectations of their position, and to create cross-campus plans this year. The retreat last summer was well organized, the leadership team participated in fun ice breakers, and engaging presentations to help the leadership team understand how they could be a part of achieving a larger vision.

In the Fall, MPSA actively recruited members, creating new and creative marketing strategies.  A kick-off meeting and pizza party was hosted, “prescriptions” to join MPSA were placed in every student’s mailbox, and various liaisons hosted happy hour get-togethers as well.  Over 80% of the College of Pharmacy student body joined MPSA for a total of 515 members.  This is remarkable when one also considers that there are 10 other student organizations (fraternities, societies, service organizations) competing for the time, talents and personal funds for membership dues at the College of Pharmacy.

The Vice Presidents of Finance (one on each campus) worked tirelessly to help each liaison and coordinator set up a separate budget each of their respective areas of responsibility. With a budget of over $30,000, decisions have to be made thoughtfully and with purpose. The Vice President’s ensured that financial resources were available to accomplish the goals of the organization and that these funds were allocated in a way that allowed each sub-organization and patient care project to carry out activities that would allow MPSA to achieve its vision around inter-professional and medication-focused initiatives.

Phillips Neighborhood Clinic

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The Phillips Neighborhood Clinic (PNC) is a student run free clinic with a three-fold mission: 1) We will develop compassionate, culturally competent future health professionals in an interprofessional, team-based learning environment, 2) We will support community partnerships and promote overall health and wellbeing in the communities we serve, and 3) We will increase accessibility of comprehensive, quality health services to patients with unmet needs.

We strive to achieve this mission by providing free clinical services and medications twice weekly to any patient that presents in clinic.  Some of the services offered include physicals, wellness checks, dermatology, ophthalmology, foot care, women’s health, physical therapy, nutrition, oral health, and legal guidance.  With a strong emphasis on interprofessional education, the clinic provides a dynamic learning environment for students from 9 different schools housed at the University of Minnesota: Dental, Law, Medical, Nursing, Nutrition, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, Public Health, and Social Work. The clinic sees over 1,000 patients annually and offers educational experiences to over 350 volunteers and 100 preceptors each year.

In addition to direct patient care, the PNC volunteers also strive to develop community partnerships. Our volunteers are required to complete community outreach volunteer hours in addition to their clinic volunteer requirements in order to develop relationships within the community to better serve our patients and develop patient-provider rapport. PNC has also maintained a community advisory board with alumni and community partners that advise the PNC board on current and prospective initiatives.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

PNC recruits students from 9 professional schools within the University. This effort requires extensive communication and organization amongst our volunteers. This past year, the clinic received 220 applications from incoming first year professional students. The interview process involves both our leadership team and all clinic volunteers as interviewers and each application is read, interviewed, evaluated, and discussed. This process allows all volunteers the opportunity to give input on the future direction of PNC while developing an appreciation of differences, responsibility, and accountability.

The use of resources at PNC is exceptional due to our expansive network amongst the number of professional students at the clinic. Not only is the clinic able to provide medical and pharmacy services to patients, but we also provide physical therapy, nutrition consultation, mental health screening, dental screenings, law guidance and representation, and resource referral. This use of resources not only enhances patient care, but it provides further learning experiences. Students who learn from these services are both the students directly providing the services, as well as other observing students who learn how they can expand their clinical knowledge in a less familiar area. This aspect of clinic highlights our interprofessional nature and emphasizes interdependence within our clinical model.

Officer training is a critical aspect of the PNC’s work due to high turnover. Our process includes a transition retreat and careful documentation of our role responsibilities. Due to the nature of high turnover in leadership, this also develops resilience and tolerance of ambiguity during the transition process.

Student National Medical Association

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The UMN chapter of Student National Medical Association is committed to: 1) supporting current and future underrepresented minority medical students, 2) addressing the needs of underserved communities, and 3) increasing the number of clinically excellent and culturally competent physicians. To achieve these aims, our SNMA chapter focuses on 1) mentorship, 2) service, and 3) education. In terms of mentoring minority pre-medical students, we offer the five part Empowering Seminar Series, the Premedical Forum, and the year long Mentorship Program. In terms of mentorship for medical students, we offer the Physician Networking Event and MS1-MS2 Pairs, as well as opportunities for socialization and support through the Revisit Social and Mixer, Goldy’s Gameroom Bowling, Welcome BBQ, Midterm Goody Bags, Friendsgiving, and the Graduate Student Mixer. In terms of service, we provide: blood pressure screening at the State Fair, pathology specimen education at the Science Museum, and outreach to high school students at the PEASE Academy and Metro Schools. In addition, we hold a Second Harvest Food Drive and an annual Health Fair. In terms of education, we host speakers for our lunch lectures and general body meetings, help co-sponsor the #ActionsSpeakLouder silent protest and the Hippocrates Café, and attend regional and national SNMA conferences. The UMN SNMA chapter strives to: support underrepresented minority students via mentorship activities, address the needs of underserved communities via volunteer activities, and increase the number of clinically excellent and culturally competent physicians via opportunities for education.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

For recruitment, we expanded our email listserv to over 300 members, and send biweekly announcement digests to our listserv highlighting our upcoming events, events in the community, and scholarship and internship opportunities. We held a table at the medical school activities fair and sponsored an orientation snack break. For marketing, we created a website for the SNMA Health Fair (z.umn.edu/healthfair) as well as rolled out a new chapter website (z.umn.edu/snma). We also have an active Facebook group. For resources, we utilized grants from Student Unions & Activities, Professional Student Government, Center for Health Equity, Office of Minority Affairs and Diversity, UCare, and the Medical School to secure over $20,000 in funding. For officer training, we held a day long retreat for our 2015-16 executive board members. At the retreat, we planned our events for the 2015-16 year and participated in an Escape MSP scenario. We held 2-3 executive board meetings per semester to ensure timely event planning. We also had 6 SNMA members travel to the 2015 Annual Medical Education Conference for officer training. In 2016, we will be sending 9 SNMA members to the Annual Medical Education Conference.