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People's Choice Award

This award recognizes two outstanding student groups selected by the students at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. The nominees in this category are the top 6 groups in the Outstanding Undergraduate Student Group of the Year and top 5 groups in the Outstanding Graduate or Professional Student Group of the Year categories as determined by the Excellence Awards Selection Committee. The two winning groups will be announced at the Tony Diggs Excellence Awards Ceremony.

Learn more about the groups by reading the following excerpts from the groups' Excellence Award nomination.  The Student Group Directory on GopherLink includes the groups' profile page for more information.

Vote here for the People's Choice Award! Voting will close on Sunday, March 26th at 11:59pm.

Group Nominee Overview

Outstanding Undergraduate Student Group of the Year

Outstanding Graduate or Professional Student Group of the Year

Outstanding Undergraduate Student Group of the Year

Al-Madinah Cultural Center

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

Al-Madinah Cultural Center seeks to create a better understanding and appreciation for the diverse cultures of Islam through educational, social, and community activities at the University of Minnesota, providing a welcoming environment for all students to gather and interact. Our mission is twofold: To serve the Muslim minority on campus as well as to serve the campus community at large. Our organization practices self-awareness by tailoring itself to the communities that it serves. To the Muslim community, we have worked to keep the room open as often as possible, providing a space to pray throughout the day. With the political atmosphere creating tension for minority students, we’ve utilized our space as a place for healing and support. Doing this showed us the resilience of the Muslim community and motivated us to push our organization’s standards even higher. For the larger campus community, we have held events to educate our peers about different cultures and practices. This appreciation for diversity is seen in our monthly Cultural Showcases and our collaboration with numerous cultural centers and organizations. Our main goal, to serve the community, is one that we are constantly working towards. Every year through our First-Year Mentoring Program and College Day event, we strive to diversify and increase membership by educating potential and first-year students about the resources both the University and our organization provide. Our efforts have not only retained active members of the University community, but have also empowered students by encouraging leadership development and fostering creativity and diversity.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

AMCC has been undoubtedly outstanding in regards to recruitment by maintaining a first year mentoring program. With over 50 students signing up, we have paired first year students with other students more familiar with our university. This program has helped with recruitment because it promotes interconnectedness between established general body members and incoming ones. Mentors are paired with mentees based on common interests to make for more compatible pairs to give first year students the best possible experience. In regards to marketing and outreach, AMCC has brought out students in droves for events by advertising through paper, social media, and most importantly, word of mouth. You will not know how awesome our events are unless you have been to them, or heard about them from someone who has. This leads us to our most valuable resource of all, our peers. Bringing out the campus community is a piece of pie when you are active in it. We have pooled resources with other cultural centers and groups to be able to pull off extremely successful events, such as International Bazaar. Planning events, we have seen the importance of hashing out all the small details in advance, creating internal agendas for all of our events. Doing this all to serve the campus community, we also realize it is important to ensure consistency in the executive board year to year. Officer training is done by meeting, new officer to old officer and discussing goals and expectations of the role for the upcoming year.

Alpha Sigma Kappa - Women in Technical Studies

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

As an organization for undergraduate women pursuing degrees in STEM fields, we strive to make a community for individuals who often feel unwelcome or alone inside of male-dominated classrooms. We create this community through Alpha Sigma Kappa’s purpose of promoting friendship, promoting academic achievement, creating unity within the sisterhood, and being active in philanthropy throughout the community.

To promote friendship and create unity within the sisterhood, each semester a member serves as our Sisterhood Chair, and she fosters bonds between the members of our organization through planning sisterhood events.

For academic achievement, we similarly elect a Scholastic Chair. The Scholastic Chair organizes weekly study hours and provides information on campus resources to promote academic success. Throughout my three years as a member of Alpha Sigma Kappa, I have learned we have the unique advantage of providing mentorship to new members, as our upper-class members can provide help and tutoring in introduction STEM courses, as well as serving as a role model for our members who do not often get to work with female professors or teaching assistants.

Lastly, we engage in philanthropy throughout the community through event planning organized by our Philanthropy Chair. Alpha Sigma Kappa fundraises for and attends Relay for Life. We also have organized bake sales and de-stress events, which have allowed us to donate to causes relating to mental health and promoting science in childhood classrooms. This semester we have pledged to strengthen our service to the community through volunteering.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

Recruitment is important to Alpha Sigma Kappa. Each semester, our Vice President organizes six recruitment events with the help of a recruitment committee as an opportunity for potential new members to meet our current members. These recruitment events have been successful through our use of social media to promote our events, as well as using flyers around campus. Each semester we welcome anywhere from five to twenty new members.

Alpha Sigma Kappa prides itself on creating create a community and hosting events on a small budget. Greek Life is not accessible to all members of the community due to the financial obligations of joining. However, Alpha Sigma Kappa provides the traditional Greek-life experience at the fraction of a typical sorority cost. This is possible through our Treasurer, who creates a budget for the semester, which is then approved by all members of the organization. This ensures our money is being used responsibly and effectively. We also use free events hosted by SUA as opportunities for us to bond as an organization.

As an organization with 18 different chair positions, the officer transition period is critical. To effectively train our officers, we host Officer Meetings every three weeks, as well as compile and pass on binders of resources to each new officer.

Lastly, Alpha Sigma Kappa has a large campus presence through our events. In past semesters, our successful events have included Scare Stress Away with ASK, hosting a formal, and organizing ceremonies such as Initiation, and the Alumnae Ceremony.

Business Association of Multicultural Students

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The Business Association of Multicultural Students seeks to provide its members with a diverse perspective of today’s global business environment and assist them in their pursuit of professional excellence and community leadership. Within this mission, there is an emphasis on “3 P’s” of:

Providing professional development in all aspects of business

Perfecting the relationship between students and the business industry

Promoting multiculturalism, leadership, and community service

We host weekly meetings as well as various social and networking events throughout the school year. BAM separates itself from other business student groups because of our commitment to inclusivity and representation of diverse students.

BAM opens up its events to students across all colleges, showing an appreciation for differences in background, major and thought. In order to provide professional development opportunities for our members, BAM hosts monthly workshops with a different professional development topic each time. BAM bridges the gap between students and the business industry by having weekly meetings featuring prominent Fortune 500 companies. During the weekly meetings, members are given valuable networking opportunities and begin searching for careers. BAM promotes multiculturalism and community service during semester-long planning of philanthropic events. Our philanthropic events bring together the campus community and corporate sponsors for a common goal of bringing awareness and donating to great causes.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

BAM events are open to all University of Minnesota students, but we charge a $10 membership fee for students who seek to further their involvement with BAM. Benefits of membership include priority registration to events, access to leadership positions during the semester, an invitation to the end of the year banquet and the opportunity to be elected to a board position. After paying the fee, students have made a small but meaningful investment with BAM, and this increases event attendance significantly.

The BAM board members show resilience in stepping into their positions with only 3 weeks (Winter Break) to acclimate themselves. In 3 short weeks, incoming officers were able to meet with the outgoing officers in the same positions and train in for the new year.

BAM is able to acquire funding entirely through corporate sponsorship. The corporate sponsors value the opportunity to connect with our members in a BAM allocates our funds to give them and our general members the best return on time invested with us. Keeping in mind our goal, the events we put on to engage corporate sponsors and students must achieve the 3 P’s.

Camp Kesem at University of Minnesota

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The mission of Camp Kesem is to support children through and beyond their parent’s cancer with innovative, fun-filled programs that foster a lasting community. Camp Kesem Minnesota provides a free summer camp to children from 6-16 years old affected by a parent’s cancer. Led by the passionate volunteer efforts of University of Minnesota-Twin Cities students, Camp Kesem delivers what these kids need most- support, understanding, and empathy as they deal with a reality no child should face. Camp Kesem Minnesota has been able to support and provide camp to our specific population of children whose parents have been affected by cancer for the past 4 years. Our goal has been to continue outreach, and expand the size and length of our camp to reach a larger population. We have shattered our goals in the past, and have been able to continue to grow the numbers of campers we serve, and the length of time of camp. For a third year, we will offer two weeks of camp in August 2017 in order to serve an increased number of campers. Last year we were able to send 130 children to camp, and our goal is to increase the campers reached to 160 this summer.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

With each year of camp, support for Camp Kesem Minnesota grows within the Minnesota area. Our Volunteer Coordinators worked exceptionally to promote our interview dates, and encourage undergraduate students to apply to join. This year, we were able to recruit 20 new counselors, and we have involvement from 15 additional members currently on our waitlist. Our Volunteer Coordinators are responsible for planning three counselor training seminars and regular chapter meetings involving small team competitions in our Color Corps, as well as requiring completion of online counselor training camp videos that Camp Kesem National uses as an organizational standard.

The Executive Board is also comprised of a PR Coordinator, and two Outreach Coordinators. Through their continued work we have been able to expand our presence on all forms of social media, and upgrade to a new fundraising online platform. Our Outreach Coordinators also use our community to spread awareness of Camp Kesem, and continuously recruit new families to join the Camp Kesem family. We also reach out to schools, guidance counselors, hospitals, and social workers in the Twin Cities area to fundraise and meet new families.

Our Operations Coordinators plan and execute camp, the main event of our chapter for the year. They work with our Treasurer to plan a budget, create a theme for the week, and plan the detailed schedule for each day of camp. From finding supplies to coordinating with Volunteer and Outreach Coordinators to distribute campers and counselors into units, the Operations team maximizes our impact with the resources we have.

Because we provide our camp for free, the student leaders are responsible for raising our entire budget. We continue to capitalize on our location by completing profit shares, volunteer cleanups, and fundraisers on campus. Only 9% of this budget is devoted to overhead costs paid directly to Camp Kesem National. Otherwise, the funds are spent to provide each camper with free food, lodging, art supplies, and other items for camp activities for an entire week.

Design U

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

Design U exists for a simple purpose: to bring ambitious students together to create exceptional products. We provide students with the opportunity to engage in fast-paced, real world design work by partnering with startups around the Minneapolis and St. Paul area. In an academic environment with a strong emphasis on the theoretical, Design U serves as a link to the tangible. Our organization is composed of students from all different academic backgrounds, bringing together the skills and interests of engineers, businessmen and women, and designers to successfully operate as a product design consultancy. Design U is structured under 3 divisions, Research + Strategy, Digital, and Prototyping, which are then connected with clients seeking work in respective areas. We create strong + mutually beneficial relationships with our clients - students are given an opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills in different industries while the start-ups receive free service and insight from college students. This was the group’s first semester under this new structure, and the group had a total of 85 applicants. After an interviewing process, 54 driven and qualified students were selected and placed on teams of 5-6 in their selected division. The teams were paired with one of 6 startups: Moxy Monitor, Bizzy Coffee, Sittereco, Red Food, Woodchuck, and Fluid Water Meter. Each team effectively communicated and collaborated with clients on ongoing projects and created exceptional deliverables by the given deadlines. Alongside project teams, Design U also consisted of an Intern Program, composed of 12 highly motivated freshmen who learn and practice design thinking on a chosen university issue.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

The executive board had a goal of attaining at least 70 applicants and selecting 45 members. Recruitment for members was accomplished through Welcome Week events, classroom visits, personal networking, social media, and a Design Thinking Carnival. During Welcome Week, we built our own booth and focused on increasing awareness + interest among incoming freshmen by participating in several student organization fairs. We advertised the group’s interdisciplinary functionality, and targeted students from all engineering, business, and design fields through flyers and branded laptop stickers. In order to reach older and more experienced members, we recruited from upper division level classes within CSOM, CSE, and CDes. We utilized Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to further create awareness and interest of the group. Our last means of recruitment was hosting a Design Thinking Carnival – participants were led through the design thinking process in a fun and interactive workshop. Each step of the process was led by a faculty member or industry expert. We successfully received an interest of over 150 students, of which 85 applied.

Throughout the semester, we continued to display Design U’s progress and achievements via social media. Our funds were used in three ways: providing resources for each division, member trainings, and event planning. We purchased building materials for the Prototyping teams, software for the Digital teams, and interviewing materials for the Research + Strategy teams. We used these resources to implement trainings for all group members, covering the design thinking process, client relations, and division specific trainings. Design U hosts several events for members, such as industry site visits around the Minneapolis area. These off-campus visits allow students the opportunity to connect + engage with industry members and learn more about different design fields. We partnered with 10,000 Makes to help host a 2-day event which invited students from all disciplines to create + develop a solution to one of the university’s Grand Challenges. Lastly, we host team bonding events in hopes to create an overall tight-knit group.

Undergraduate Women in Business

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

Women in Business is a student organization at the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management that is dedicated to bringing together business professionals and students of all majors to network and learn about pertinent topics within business. Women in Business is for students that wish to grow personally and professionally through invaluable networks as well as for business professionals who wish to give back to the Twin Cities community and help develop its future business leaders. This student group exceeded its expectations in 2016 by connecting over 375 members to 16 corporate sponsors in the Twin Cities area, allowing students to expand their professional networks and prepare for their future careers. The relationship Women in Business has with its corporate sponsors is one of interdependence: the sponsors rely on the student group to for access to top business talent, and the students rely on the sponsors for personal and professional development opportunities. One of the main goals that Women in Business had at the beginning of the year was to expand and diversify its membership base to include students in colleges outside of the Carlson School. It met this goal by inviting 100+ non-Carlson members into the group this year.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

Women in Business holds a meeting every April which allows the outgoing and incoming Executive Boards to successfully transition and prepare for the upcoming year. It is expected that each officer meet with her predecessor in person at least twice after the transition meeting to ensure that the new Executive Board has the resources and knowledge they need to succeed. Women in Business recruited over 375 members this school year, with 100+ of those students being non-Carlson students. This was a tremendous accomplishment and it helped the group become more inclusive and transparent with its initiatives across colleges at the University of Minnesota. The Women in Business Buddy Program also helped the group combat the attrition issue seen among upperclassmen students. The Buddy Program was successful at engaging 46 Bigs and 84 Littles, creating the largest program the group has ever had. The financial resources that Women in Business receives from member dues and sponsorship dollars go toward personal and professional development events. The group held two networking events, a Charity Gala benefiting the Jeremiah Program, numerous sponsor speaker meetings and company site visits, and several volunteer events during 2016. Women in Business also partnered with the Society of Women Engineers to bridge the gap between business and engineering, which allowed the group to better connect with the campus community. By providing a variety of events for members to attend, the group successfully achieves its mission and promotes its four pillars: social, philanthropic, educational, and professional.

Outstanding Graduate or Professional Student Group of the Year

Chemical Engineering and Materials Science (CEMS) Women's Group

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The CEMS (Chemical Engineering and Materials Science) Women's Group (WG) works to foster and support the women in the department as scientists and career women, as well as to promote all current and future women in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields. The group accomplishes those goals with science outreach activities to local K-12 students, with discussions of current media and literature about women in STEM, through professional development workshops, and by inviting successful women in those fields to share their insights with the group.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

Recruitment: Women’s Group (WG) connects with female graduate students during recruitment visits, during which the members showcase the strong organization of professional women in the department to welcome and support them.

Marketing and outreach to campus community: WG hosts two luncheons for first-year graduate students to meet the other women in the department (students and faculty). They advertise all events through a listserv. WG collaborates with other campus organizations (e.g., Council on Graduate Students (COGS)) and other departments to execute professional workshops and networking programs, including the CEMS networking event and the CEMS alumni mentoring program, to support the professional development of the entire department. The networking event allows industrial representatives to interact with graduate students. The mentoring program is open to both male and female students and matches them with alumni based on the student’s preference.

Use of resources: WG is supported by department resources and grants from the University. Events range in costs from $50-$300. The 2016-2017 budget for 12 events is ~$2200.

Officer training: Officers are volunteers actively involved in WG events and meetings. The officers have a transition meeting during the summer enabling the new officers to learn the behind-the-scene planning for WG sponsored programs.

Event planning: Once per semester WG officers plan events. They plan at least one meeting per month. This allows the work to be spread out among the officers and gives the officers the freedom to take ownership over events they are interested in.

Family Medicine Interest Group

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The Family Medicine Interest Group (FMIG) is a vibrant and engaged student group within the medical school. Our purpose is to represent medical students interested in pursuing a career in Family Medicine and Community Health and to cultivate interest in family medicine in the medical school at large through the following:

- Speakers and organized discussion panels

- Interactive workshops on medical skills pertinent to family medicine

- Community engagement opportunities

- Facilitating contacts between medical students and practicing family physicians.

This year the FMIG team has gone above and beyond by presenting a workshop and lunch lecture nearly every month and creating new community engagement opportunities for medical students.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

FMIG has tenaciously recruited aspiring family physicians, yielding 244 active members within the medical school this year. FMIG has also recruited 14 students for the American Association of Family Physicians this year, one of our national partner organizations.

Our event planning this year has been innovative and organized. We have hosted new lunch lectures and workshops to supplement our medical education with topics that are influential to future careers in medicine. Our events have also helped foster a sense of community among students who have an interest in primary care, and specifically family medicine.

We are very fortunate to be supported by the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health. We have used our financial resources from the department responsibly and prudently. We have also benefitted from the valuable knowledge of faculty and residents within the department at our lunch lectures and workshops.

Phillips Neighborhood Clinic

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The Phillips Neighborhood Clinic (PNC) is a student run free clinic with a three-fold mission: 1) We will develop compassionate, culturally competent future health professionals in an interprofessional, team-based learning environment, 2) We will support community partnerships and promote overall health and wellbeing in the communities we serve, and 3) We will increase accessibility of comprehensive, quality health services to patients with unmet needs.

We strive to achieve this mission by providing free clinical services and medications twice weekly to any patient that presents in clinic.  Some of the services offered include physicals, wellness checks, dermatology, ophthalmology, foot care, women’s health, physical therapy, nutrition, oral health, and legal guidance.  With a strong emphasis on interprofessional education, the clinic provides a dynamic learning environment for students from nine different schools housed at the University of Minnesota: Dental, Law, Medical, Nursing, Nutrition, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, Public Health, and Social Work. The clinic sees over 1,000 patients annually and offers educational experiences to over 350 volunteers and 100 preceptors each year.

In addition to direct patient care, the PNC volunteers also strive to develop community partnerships. Our volunteers are required to complete community outreach volunteer hours in addition to their clinic volunteer requirements in order to develop relationships within the community to better serve our patients and develop patient-provider rapport. PNC has also maintained a community advisory board with alumni and community partners that advise the PNC board on current and prospective initiatives.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

PNC recruits students from 9 professional schools within the University, as well as undergraduate programs including nursing and medical laboratory sciences. This effort requires extensive communication and organization amongst our volunteers.This past year, the clinic received 229 applications from incoming first year professional students. The interview process involves both our leadership team and all clinic volunteers as interviewers and each application is read, interviewed, evaluated, and discussed. This process allows all volunteers the opportunity to give input on the future direction of PNC while developing an appreciation of differences, responsibility, and accountability.

The use of resources at PNC is exceptional due to our expansive network amongst the number of professional students at the clinic. Not only is the clinic able to provide medical and pharmacy services to patients, but we also provide physical therapy, nutrition consultation, mental health screening, dental screenings, law guidance and representation, and resource referral. This use of resources not only enhances patient care, but it provides further learning experiences. Students who learn from these services are both the students directly providing the services, as well as other observing students who learn how they can expand their clinical knowledge in a less familiar area. This aspect of clinic highlights our interprofessional nature and emphasizes interdependence within our clinical model.

Officer training is a critical aspect of the PNC’s work due to high turnover. Our process includes a transition retreat and careful documentation of our role responsibilities. Due to the nature of high turnover in leadership, this also develops resilience and tolerance of ambiguity during the transition process.

Reproductive Health & Sexual Medicine Student Interest Group

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The Reproductive Health and Sexual Medicine (RHSM) student group aims to facilitate interest, knowledge, and discussion regarding human sexuality, reproductive health, sexual function and dysfunction, sexuality across the lifetime, and sexual minority health. We hope to unite interests across a diverse range of primary care and surgical fields in order to best serve our patients in every stage of their lives.

As the first year that we have been in operation, RHSM has already exceeded their goal of raising awareness for sexual medicine on campus.

We have successfully developed and implemented a "Sexual Health Week" in February that brought academic lectures and educational workshops to our student body. We polled our group members on what topics were most important to them and subsequently assigned officers a day to independently plan an event. Our final product consists of: a lunch lecture hosted by Planned Parenthood MN on the state of reproductive health policy, a lunchtime presentation from Breaking Free - a group that speaks on sex trafficking and the role of physicians in prevention, a lecture on the pros and cons of circumscision by pediatric urologist Dr. Jane Lewis, and lastly a lecture on the intersections of faith and sexuality from the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. Additionally, we brought local advocacy organization Smitten Kitten to lead a workshop on "Pleasurably Positive: Sex with STIs."

During the planning of Sexual Health Week, we partnered with multiple existing student groups such as Medical Students for Choice and PRIDE in Healthcare. We were also fortunate to partner with Bedsider U, a national non-profit organization that promotes contraception, and form a multi-disciplinary coalition across many colleges at the U outside of the medical school.

While we have only been operational for several months, we are already looking for additional ways to further our mission on campus.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

Our group was formed in October of 2016, and as such we received no financing from the Student Union or Medical School Class. Starting a new organization with no budget was difficulty, however RHSM rose to the challenge. We successfully brokered a partnership with the Program in Human Sexuality (a division of the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health) to cover the costs of our in-person meetings, and initial administrative costs (i.e. registration, website development, etc.) were covered personally by members.

In order to develop our Sexual Health Week, we successfully raised over $1300 from outside organizations such as the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality, Planned Parenthood, and the Religions Coalition for Reproductive Choice. We also applied and were accepted as an official Bedsider U representative student group, which has allowed us access to outreach and marketing materials from the national non-profit. Overall we have been extremely successful with our limited resources to become financially solvent and plan a wonderful event for out community.

Student National Medical Association

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What are the mission, purpose and goals of the group and how has the group met or exceeded these goals?

The UMN chapter of Student National Medical Association is committed to: 1) supporting current and future underrepresented minority medical students, 2) addressing the needs of underserved communities, and 3) increasing the number of clinically excellent and culturally competent physicians. To achieve these aims, our SNMA chapter focuses on 1) mentorship, 2) service, and 3) education. In terms of mentoring minority pre-medical students, we offer the five part Empowering Seminar Series, the Premedical Forum, and the year long Mentorship Program. In terms of mentorship for medical students, we offer the Physician Networking Event and MS1-MS2 Pairs, as well as opportunities for socialization and support through the Revisit Social and Mixer, Goldy’s Gameroom Bowling, Welcome BBQ, Midterm Goody Bags, Friendsgiving, and the Graduate Student Mixer. In terms of service, we provide: blood pressure screening at the State Fair, pathology specimen education at the Science Museum, and outreach to high school students at the Higher Ground Academy. In addition, we hold a Second Harvest Food Drive and an annual Health Fair. In terms of education, we host speakers for our lunch lectures and general body meetings, help co-sponsor the #BuildBridgesNotWalls protest and the Hippocrates Café, and attend regional and national SNMA conferences. The UMN SNMA chapter strives to: support underrepresented minority students via mentorship activities, address the needs of underserved communities via volunteer activities, and increase the number of clinically excellent and culturally competent physicians via opportunities for education.

Please address how the student group was outstanding in the following areas: recruitment, marketing and outreach to campus community, use of resources (financial, etc.), officer training and event planning.

For recruitment, we expanded our email listserv to over 300 members, and send biweekly announcement digests to our listserv highlighting our upcoming events, events in the community, and scholarship and internship opportunities. We held a table at the medical school activities fair and sponsored an orientation snack break. For marketing, we created a website for the SNMA Health Fair (z.umn.edu/healthfair) as well as rolled out a new chapter website (z.umn.edu/snma). We also have an active Facebook group. For resources, we utilized grants from Student Unions & Activities, Professional Student Government, Office of Minority Affairs and Diversity, Blue Shield Blue Cross, and the Medical School to secure over $20,000 in funding. For officer training, we held a day long retreat for our 2016-17 executive board members. At the retreat, we planned our events for the 2016-17 year and participated in an Escape MSP scenario. We held 2-3 executive board meetings per semester to ensure timely event planning. We also had 8 SNMA members travel to the 2016 Annual Medical Education Conference for officer training. In 2017, we will be sending 20 SNMA members to the Annual Medical Education Conference.